1. Problem and Solution
 

Problem

Investment banks and family offices sustain significant risks employing a strategy of "insulation" 

  1. In focus on more developed economies, thereby ignoring opportunities to improve the investment readiness of scores of transitional economies.
  1. In priority, by committing disproportionately to stable countries, thereby ignoring rising problems in less developed countries and contributing to negative regional and international secondary effects, such as global environmental degradation and mass migration.

  2. In interaction, by engaging with select local, national, regional, and international stakeholders and ignoring other key actors and spoilers, thereby adding risk to the investment.

  3.  In communication—because different industries, sectors of society, and governmental agencies describe and conceptualize situations differently, which leads to all-pervasive miscommunication and misunderstanding.  
     

An additional risk for family offices

  1. In scope, targeting only isolated issues such as immunization, monitoring elections, educating girls, or digging wells neglects the development of the country as a whole, thereby leaving investments vulnerable to unforeseen disruptions, and undermining the long-term viability of any investment.


Solution

  • INCA (Inclusive Nationalism Capacity Assessment): a comprehensive, developmental, simple assessment

  • The Shared Information Framework: a process to generate common understanding among influential organizations

In a single image, INCA represents a picture of a country that is comprehensive and reveals threats to the country and the country’s capacity to adapt to those threats. Based on transparency and inclusiveness, the framework and INCA serve as a universal foundation for communication about any aspect of a country.

INCA and the Shared Information Framework help with the all the problems listed above by solving the communication problem.

INCA and the Shared Information Framework offer a successfully field-tested approach to generate a comprehensive developmental understanding of a chosen country and provides a common shared vocabulary to describe and think about the country. 

INCA and the Shared Information Framework enable broad engagement of key stakeholders and effective communication among local and international public and private sector organizations about the threats, risks, challenges and opportunities in a country, and the sovereign and adaptive capacities of the country. 

INCA and the Shared Information Framework help prepare new markets for investment banks, help social impact investors to solve environmental and social challenges, and lower the risks and costs of doing business for ventures already at work within the country.

INCA sample March 2018.jpg

3. The Inclusive Nationalism Capacity Assessment
(INCA)

 

What is INCA and why is it important?

The Inclusive Nationalism Capacity Assessment (INCA) is a specialized tool that can be used to assess the threat status of a country, and its sovereign capacity and adaptive capacity. INCA consists of a set of 8 levels reflecting the status of a country along 18 dimensions that represent its capacities and current threats.

Inclusive nationalism here refers to the progressive inclusion of all population subgroups as a nation develops. Inclusiveness is also built into the shared information framework through its equitable opportunity for involvement for the local, regional, and international prime actors that are most influential in the life of a country to participate in the assessment of the country and each other.

INCA provides a common vocabulary for use by prime actors and the public in the construction of the Shared Information Framework. The framework enables better and more predictable enforcement of the multiparty agreements necessary for the effective implementation of private and public-sector national-scale initiatives. The cooperative nature of the framework’s processes leads to more successful ventures and a more cooperative and inclusive society.


What are the levels for?

The purpose of the levels is to provide simple, numeric measures of increasing sovereign and adaptive national capacity. The simplicity of the measures makes them accessible and useful to a wide range of organizations, from different countries and different sectors of a society. The simplicity also makes it possible for prime actors (the local, regional, and international organizations and other entities most influential in the life of the country) to use INCA to assess threats to the country, and the country’s status along particular dimensions of sovereign and adaptive capacity. The levels reflect the phases of progress that a country is expected to traverse as it moves from very basic capabilities that are local to advanced capabilities that are more inclusive and global. In Phases 3, 4, and 5 of the Shared Information Framework, the range of perceptions (from different prime actors) about the status of a country will be shared and responded to, until reassessments converge to a common assessment of national capacities is arrived at among all the prime actors.

In Phases 3, 4, and 5, the levels are intended to draw opinions about the country’s national capacities from prime actor participants and are not meant to be used as a measurement tool that provides conclusive evidence. The purpose of Phases 3, 4, and 5 is to assist in the development of a more comprehensive understanding of the country’s status by exposing each prime actor to the perspectives of the other prime actors. The process leads to a common political and sociocultural operating picture of the country that helps the country in many ways: lowers political risk, increases predictability, and enables better multiparty agreements. 

The Shared Information Framework is built in five phases.

The first phase combines a Sovereignty First desk assessment of the country with the client's own assessment of the country, using INCA as a common vocabulary. The value of an INCA assessment is that it measures the sovereign,  economic, and social capacity of a country to adapt to threats and opportunities, and it simple to understand.

  • Ideal to communicate about the country within your organization and with partners.
  • 4 months. 

The second phase adds the insights of local experts in each of INCA 17 dimensions. Sovereignty First, the client, and a score of local experts are able to use INCA as a common vocabulary. The value of a local-experts-INCA assessment is that it includes expert local perspectives rarely included in assessments.

  • Ideal if you need a range of on-the-ground insights for your investment. 
  • 6 months. 

The third phase changes who does the assessing—from assessments by experts to assessments by influential local, regional, and international organizations ("prime actors"). Prime actors assess the country using INCA, and assess each other's influence, importance, and motivations. For participating prime actors, INCA begins to become a common vocabulary. The value of a prime-actor-assessment is that it reveals how prime actors see the country and each other in dramatically different ways, and thus how unreliable every perspective is.

  • Ideal if you need to understand the reliability of the information on which your success depends, and if you need to understand the trustworthiness and influence of a number of different organizations.  
  • 8 months. 

The fourth phase is the Shared Information Framework's unique contribution. Whereas the third phase revealed how much the assessments of different prime actors differed, the fourth phase aims to bring most of the prime actors into agreement about what they perceive. Over rounds of assessment, with feedback about the assessments among the prime actor participants, coaching, and events that bring them together, prime actors move to a common understanding of the country and each other. The value of common understanding is it that makes the environment and the actions of other prime actors easier to predict. 

  • Ideal if you need a relatively transparent environment in order to create financial instruments or to initiate and negotiate an enforceable multiparty agreement. Also ideal if you are locked into a long position on a project with high political risk or that is already suffering setbacks and delays.
  • 6 years.

The fifth phase continues the work of the previous phase. Once a common understanding has been achieved among most prime actors, it should be extended to all prime actors, to new actors entering the space, and to new leaders of already active prime actor organizations. The value of growing and deepening common understanding is that it makes it easier to negotiate enforceable multiparty agreements. 

  • Ideal if you need long-term transparency and predictability in a country, or if your goal for a country is sovereignty, stability, and development. 
  • Ongoing.

 

 

Dr. Wolterstorff speaks to a gathering the Association for the US Army's joint conference with the US Army War College Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute. 

The Atlantic Council's Syria Source blog:
Finding Ground Truth in Syria: Bringing Light to a Confused Information Environment

Wolterstorff, Eric. "INCA: Creating an opportunity for Shared Responsibility." US Army War College, Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Journal, Volume 6, Issue 1, September 2015, pp. 12-13. 

 Kurdish journalist Friyal Faisal being interviewed by a local news network. May 2016

Kurdish journalist Friyal Faisal being interviewed by a local news network. May 2016

 Syrian Promise team members help Karen Dickman of Sovereignty First to obtain participant interviews in Gaziantep.

Syrian Promise team members help Karen Dickman of Sovereignty First to obtain participant interviews in Gaziantep.

 Relatives of slain Pershmerga at the opening of the Museum of the Fallen in Chamchamal, Iraqi Kurdistan. The quality of decision making in governance directly influences the lives of individual people, families, and communities as a whole. 

Relatives of slain Pershmerga at the opening of the Museum of the Fallen in Chamchamal, Iraqi Kurdistan. The quality of decision making in governance directly influences the lives of individual people, families, and communities as a whole. 

 Maj Gen (Ret) Charles E. Tucker,  Dr. Mahmoud Duwairi, Craig Coletta, Sawsan Alfayez, and Dr. Eric Woltertorff on the University of Jordan campus.

Maj Gen (Ret) Charles E. Tucker,  Dr. Mahmoud Duwairi, Craig Coletta, Sawsan Alfayez, and Dr. Eric Woltertorff on the University of Jordan campus.

 Jordanian politics, society and culture is built on thousands of years of development and history.

Jordanian politics, society and culture is built on thousands of years of development and history.

 Ahmed Qadir Balkhayi and a new friend at dinner with Sovereignty First in Erbil. 

Ahmed Qadir Balkhayi and a new friend at dinner with Sovereignty First in Erbil. 

For more information, a presentation, or a price sheet—

Contact Eric Wolterstorff

eric.wolterstorff@sovereigntyfirst.com

 

To join our team—

Contact Madeline O'Harra

madeline.oharra@sovereigntyfirst.com

 

Sovereignty First

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Arlington, VA 22209

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